If you are not growing-You are dying !!!

growth is addictive

by  Darpan Sachdeva

via Team Tony at www.tonyrobbins.com

Tony Robbins says that if you’re not growing, you’re dying. No wonder that he’s addicted to growth, obsessively focused on learning, understanding, and mastering new things, from finance strategies to playing polo. But growth doesn’t require massive changes 24/7 — for many of us it’s woven into our daily routine.

Think about it. How do you integrate growth in your life? Good methods of growing can be anything from feeding your mind with books, classes or lectures. Or perhaps even just listening to others and to the world around you. Growth can be taking a chance, a risk, or putting yourself in a situation that may be out of your wheelhouse. It also may be pushing yourself, and trying to find new ways to be a better version of yourself every single day. If you’re a business owner, then maybe it’s finding new strategies or tactics to growing your business or your investments. Or maybe it’s learning a new language or skill. It could also be something simple like trying a new kind of food, seeing a different movie than you usually do, or pushing yourself to not settle for the known but to reach, instead, for the unknown.

Growth can come in many forms. But growth creates the most impact when it leads to mastery. Remember, mastery has three levels: intellectual, emotional and physical, as Tony lays out here:

 

Repetition is the mother of skill, which is why for so many of us growth is truly addictive. Think of it this way — the more you grow, the more you’re able to master. The more you master, the more you grow. How’s that for a positive feedback cycle? And the more you bring growth into your body, the less you have to think about it.




 

How do you incorporate growth into your life? Have you made a habit of investing in yourself to grow as a person? Whether learning a new language, trying a new activity, or even attempting a new challenge, making growth a priority – and a habit – will make your life one of dynamic improvement.




 

Blog PhotoDarpan Sachdeva is the CEO and Founder of Nobel thoughts.com. With a long time passion for Entrepreneurship, Self development & Success, Darpan started his website with the intention of educating and inspiring like-minded people all over the world to always strive for success no matter what their circumstances.To keep going and never get disheartened and learn from every adversity.

What Really Matters at the End of Life-Ted Talk by BJ Miller

by Darpan Sachdeva

Some people are so afraid to die that they never begin to live. –Henry Van Dyke

This Ted talk by BJ Miller is one what i have been been re- watching during the week and found of an immense value to share.

 

 

At the end of our lives, what do we most wish for? For many, it’s simply comfort, respect, love. BJ Miller is a palliative care physician at Zen Hospice Project who thinks deeply about how to create a dignified, graceful end of life for his patients. Take the time to savor this moving talk, which asks big questions about how we think on death and honor life.

 




Blog PhotoDarpan Sachdeva is the CEO and Founder of Nobel thoughts.com. With a long time passion for Entrepreneurship, Self development & Success, Darpan started his website with the intention of educating and inspiring like minded people all over the world to always strive for success no matter what their circumstances.To keep going and never get disheartened and learn from every adversity.

 

 

This powerful video may change the way you eat

by Darpan Sachdeva

 

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Meet Jim—the  man whose life flashes right before his very eyes, unhealthy habits and all. The choices you teach your child today become the habits they take into their adulthood.This video will really change the way you look at healthy eating.

 

 

                                So why you should make healthy food choices?

Eating a healthy, balanced diet provides nutrients to your body. These nutrients give you energy and keep your heart beating, your brain active, and your muscles working.

Nutrients also help build and strengthen bones, muscles, and tendons and also regulate body processes, such as blood pressure.

Good nutrition can lower your risk of developing a range of chronic diseases. For example, eating more fruit and vegetables can help lower blood pressure and may lower your risk of certain types of cancer (such as colorectal, breast, lung and prostate cancer). Eating less saturated fat may also lower your risk of heart disease.

Healthy eating can also help people that already have some types of disease or illness such as diabetes, high cholesterol and blood pressure. And, of course, improving your eating habits will contribute to you achieving and maintaining a healthy weight.

Try to achieve a balance with the foods you eat and include lots of variety and remember, all things in moderation.

Source: livelifewell

  How do you get started on healthy eating?

Healthy eating starts with learning new ways to eat, such as adding more fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole grains and cutting back on foods that have a lot of fat, salt, and sugar.
A change to healthier eating also includes learning about balance, variety, and moderation.
Aim for balance. Most days, eat from each food group—grains, protein foods, vegetables and fruits, and dairy. Listen to your body. Eat when you’re hungry. Stop when you feel satisfied.
Look for variety. Be adventurous. Choose different foods in each food group. For example, don’t reach for an apple every time you choose a fruit. Eating a variety of foods each day will help you get all the nutrients you need.
Practice moderation. Don’t have too much or too little of one thing. All foods, if eaten in moderation, can be part of healthy eating. Even sweets can be okay.
Source: webmd

 

Blog PhotoDarpan Sachdeva is the CEO and Founder of Nobelthoughts.com. With a long time passion for Entrepreneurship, Self development & Success, Darpan started his website with the intention of educating and inspiring like minded people all over the world to always strive for success no matter what their circumstances.To keep going and never get disheartened and learn from every adversity .

 

 

A Healthy Brain Needs a Healthy Heart.

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A Healthy Brain Needs a Healthy Heart.
 by SANDRA AAMODT FEBRUARY 17, 2014, 7:00 AM

Children need exercise. Parents often worry that making time for athletics or even for just playing on the Jungle Jim is going to take away from their kids’ academic achievement. But actually, the opposite is true. There have been analyses of huge numbers of studies that all show that kids who are fit are better in school, get better grades, and have higher intelligence scores than kids who are sedentary. And that is probably because across the lifespan, even into old age, there’s a strong correlation between a healthy heart and a healthy brain.

The brain is the most demanding organ that your circulatory system has to feed. It takes up a lot of the body’s oxygen and a lot of the body’s energy. And unlike most of your tissues, your brain can’t live very long without that blood supply. You cut blood supply off for about five minutes and parts of the brain start dying. So clogged arteries and little clots that cut off blood flow to the brain in older people are a significant source of cognitive difficulty and cognitive deterioration with age. And even in little kids, being physically fit clearly enhances intellectual performance.

The other thing parents should be thinking about is that in childhood your kid needs about 90 minutes a day of active moving around, and parents should really focus, I think, on making sure that that’s fun, first of all. You don’t want to institute exercise as punishment. And you also, I think, want to have them doing something that could potentially continue into adulthood. However much your kids like climbing trees, they’re not going to be doing that when they’re 40, not most of us anyway.



And if you give them a sport or a taste for hiking or a taste for yoga, something that grownups do, you greatly reduce the chance that they’re going to be one of the large numbers of people who are active children who grow into sedentary adults. Usually that transition happens around the age of 13 or so.

In Their Own Words is recorded in Big Think’s studio.